‘Record-breaking’ deliveries predicted for Cyber Week: Canada Post

Research from PayPal reveals Canadian online shoppers are warming up to 'social commerce,' defined as buying directly from an advertisement on a social media platform. One in four (26 per cent) Canadian online shoppers have already engaged in social commerce and half (54 per cent) say they would consider it. (Photo: CNW Group/PayPal Canada)
Research from PayPal reveals Canadian online shoppers are warming up to ‘social commerce,’ defined as buying directly from an advertisement on a social media platform. One in four (26 per cent) Canadian online shoppers have already engaged in social commerce and half (54 per cent) say they would consider it. (Photo: CNW Group/PayPal Canada)

BY KELLY ROCHE

Online shoppers are virtually crashing sales from the comfort of home, with an estimated one million packages being delivered nationwide starting Monday.
“Cyber Week will generate a phenomenal number of orders this year, and is a big reason we’re expecting record-breaking parcel volumes this holiday season,” said Canada Post SVP of parcels René Desmarais.
“A lot of Canadians wait to make their purchases, knowing that Cyber Week deals and promotions will save them money.”
Starting Nov. 28, or Cyber Monday, Canada Post expects to deliver one million or more packages every weekday for three-and-a-half weeks, or nearly up to Christmas Eve.
The trend began in 2012, when Canadians were shopping online extensively, resulting in Canada Post delivering one million parcels on a single day for the first time.
Free shipping and other offers from retailers are enticing savvy Canadians; in 2015 Cyber Week parcel volumes were 44 per cent higher than the year before.

A study commissioned by PayPal reveals a ‘buy-local’ mentality is sweeping across Canada with three out of four (73%) online shoppers planning to buy holiday gifts from Canadian retailers instead of U.S. or international websites.
“Canadian retailers are embracing e-commerce more than ever before and offering greater choice to consumers who want to shop online this side of the border,” said PayPal Canada’s head of consumer marketing Kerry Reynolds.
“Canadian-sold goods are in demand and the Canadian economy stands to benefit immensely from this trend.”
Of those people, 43 per cent are planning to buy more gifts from Canadian retailers than they did last year.
Millennials are more inclined to shop online from domestic websites, with 83 per cent saying they plan to do so.
But the Competition Bureau is warning consumers to be aware of scams and knockoffs, even when they’re not intending to shop.
“Simply browsing social media, you will encounter high-end fashion items pitched at rock-bottom prices in ads and banners,” reads a news release.
“While it looks like a fantastic deal, it is really a fantasy. If the price seems too-good-to-be-true, it might be just that.”

What arrives at your door is typically an imitation item, warns the agency, made of cheap material — often in the wrong size, colour or design.

“They’re almost impossible to return for a refund. Worse, you may end up waiting by your mailbox for a package that never arrives. But, you can be sure that your credit card bill will arrive on time.”

To avoid getting scammed:
  • Know exactly who and where you are buying from.
  • Read the refund and return policies, including the fine print.
  • Don’t take ads at face value just because they are displayed on trusted social media sites.
  • If in doubt, do additional research on other websites. Shop around.
  • Beware! Consumer protection laws vary around the world and may not apply as expected.
  • Remember, if it seems too good to be true, it may be just that!

Consumers who purchased such items online and have had bad experiences can submit a complaint to the Competition Bureau  or the Canadian Anti-fraud Centre.

@qewsouthpost

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